Tuesday, February 07, 2006

This week on the shipyard



As a rule the historic vesssels in the Oude Haven are made of steel, or when they are really old, iron. This week's guest, Trui, is an exception, being made of oak wood. This is not a barge but a fishing boat. Maintenance is done by a group of volunteers.

Here is an image I took in France in a town called Maubeuge, August 2005. This is another place the tourists on their way to sunny Southern France like to skip.
It is hard for me to explain in words what I find so attractive about Maubeuge, but I am confident that the photo willl do part of the explaining for me.

The yellow lines are a standard feature of French rural stations with level crossings. This is the only colour I maintained, the rest was reduced to greyscale.
Photos Koos Fernhout

13 comments:

Erik-Jan said...

Hi Koos,
I would love an overall picture of "Trui".
b.t.w. I passed my "Marifoon" examination last saturday.
48 out of 50. I'm pleased.
Kind regards,
Erik-Jan.

Koos F said...

Hi Erik-Jan,

Congratulations! You are moving closer and closer to the old barges community.

I hope the Trui volunteers take the tarpaulin off. If not I'll take a picture next week. Most of the time they stay a few weeks before going back to their home port.
Love
Koos

Dale said...

Dear Koos

I like the idea of a wooden boat...

Would it not float better than steel or iron?
LOL

The tracks remind me of old WWII movies about the occupation of France.
Those movies are quite moving for me - no pun intended - as Canadians played a vital part in that part of the war.

You did well in keeping the yellow contrast in the photo.

Keep them coming!

Love
Dale

Mary Beth said...

Hi Koos,

Thanks for your comment on my blog - I laughed out loud! I'm sorry Val and I are giving you men a complex - but what is better than the company of both man AND beast?? For we animal lovers, there's nothing like a human companion as well as a cuddly, furry, slobbery one to make a life complete. You can't have one without the other. :)

I love the train tracks and what you've done with the colour - very artistic! Perhaps you can set up a little kiosk by the water and sell prints to the tourists in the summertime.

elena said...

Hey, very nice...I love the contrast of the yellow lines in the photo..I love the perspective on the photo of the fishing boat..

PTfan said...

Hi Koos. I thank you and really appreciate your comments on my blog! I am off to work now but I really want to spend some time on your blog. I hope I will have time this weekend.

Debby C said...

Hey Koos nice to hear from you. How's everything going? I am extremely busy with work so I haven't really been able to blog much. I will have to break out a picture of my "WHOFAN" license plate...take care!

ernie said...

great blog :) i hope you enjoyed it very well!
by the way, have you bought the humo with pete townshend in??

grtz !

Koos F said...

Oh Elke, terrible, we both forgot to buy it.
Pete wrote about an interview in Mojo. I've seen that, have read bits of it and can arrange to have a copy of it made for us. I strongly suspect it is the original of the Humo interview. Does Pete mention Bob Dylan, The Band, Ronnie Hawkins?
That would prove it.
You are now an officially appointed witness ;-)
Love
Koos

Anne-Marie said...

Hi Koos,
I am enjoying the little lessons about boats.

Mauberge is a great name. I am going to guess that you like the yellow and the grey, and that you're fond of stripes in general. :)

-AM

Kenny said...

Hi Koos,

Thanks for passing by and wishing me happy birthday. I'll need to start updating my blog more often.

Kenny

Erik-Jan said...

Hi Koos,
Thanks for putting a link up to the Historic Harbour Naarden.
Spoke to a 'klipper' owner in Monnickendam the other day. The ship is the "Nautilus" and according to the 'meetbrief' built in 1890 but never been under sail. There are no records of a steam engine. Strange isn't it. In its history it was shortened by 6 or 9 meters.
Today it is used as a party/charter boat. Any way, the owner told me that quite a few barges ended up on the Thames because they transported goods, he metioned 'eels', over the channel to London. Seems unlikely or...?
Kind regards,
Erik-Jan.

Erik-Jan said...

Hi Koos,
A small addition:
http://tinyurl.com/cpe2a
Kind regards,
Erik-Jan.